Space Force motto goes above but not beyond

space-force-motto-goes-above-but-not-beyond

“Semper Supra.”

Space Force has selected a motto, and let’s just say it didn’t exactly shoot for the stars.

The phrase, which translates to “Always above,” crashes faster than a failed satellite launch. It’s unclear why this particular slogan was chosen, but it’s about as on the nose as you can get — directionally speaking.

“We are building a new Service to secure the space domain… the ultimate high ground,” Space Force Chief Gen. Jay Raymond tweeted. “Our strategic imperative is to ensure that our space capabilities [and] the advantages they provide the nation [and] our Joint and Coalition partners are always there.”

That could very well be a reference to Obi-Wan Kenobi’s high ground comment to Anakin in “Revenge of the Sith.” Perhaps the administration could have thrown “Toy Story” in the mix as well — Buzz Lightyear’s “To infinity and beyond” has a pretty nice ring to it.

Established last December, Space Force also announced the launch of its new logo, which looks eerily similar to Star Trek’s delta design, perpetuating the notion that the service can’t escape corny space pop culture references no matter the serious nature of its operations.

Despite the allusion to Star Fleet, which officials have refuted, the explanation for the design is thorough.

“The silver outer border of the delta signifies defense and protection from threats in the space domain,” the service said in a release. “The black area inside embodies the vast darkness of deep space. Inside the delta, the two spires represent the action of a rocket launching into the outer atmosphere. The four beveled elements symbolize the joint armed forces supporting the space mission: Air Force, Army, Navy and Marines. In the center of the delta is the Polaris star meant to symbolize the guiding light.”

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Now, as we wait with bated breath for the release of the official Space Force song, one thing is certain: The service is rife with material for season two of Netflix’s Space Force.

About

Sarah Sicard is the Digital Editor of Military Times. She previously served as Army Times Editor. Other work can be found at National Defense Magazine, Task & Purpose, Defense News, Fast Company, Business Insider and AdWeek.

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